California State Controller's Office   Track Prop 30
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Approved by California voters in November 2012, Proposition 30 temporarily raised certain tax rates to provide additional financial support for public schools. Prop 30 revenues must be spent on classroom expenses and may not be used for administrative costs. The revenue transfer cannot be suspended or withheld, regardless of changes to the state budget. All revenue from Prop 30 and related disbursements will be audited by the State Controller’s Office. The expenditure of funds is audited annually by independent auditors.

Since January 1, 2012, Prop 30 has generated more than $31.2 billion*

* Projection as of June 20, 2016, provided by the California Department of Finance.

How does Prop 30 funding work?

1

Prop 30 money comes from personal income tax and sales tax revenues, as calculated annually by the California Department of Finance. The money is transferred quarterly to the State Education Protection Account, and then disbursed to county offices of education, K-12 school districts, charter schools, and community college districts.

2

County offices of education, K-12 school districts, charter schools, and community college districts spend Prop 30 money according to their adopted spending plans, which must be made public.

3

The State Controller’s Office audits the State Education Protection Account to ensure that Prop 30 money is appropriately accounted for and disbursed in a manner consistent with California Constitution article XIII, section 36.
See July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2015 audit report.

4

Independent auditors verify annually whether Prop 30 money is spent in accordance with the adopted spending plans of the county offices of education, K-12 school districts, charter schools, and community college districts. The Audit Reports are sent to the SCO for review.

Prop 30 Timeline  

(Denotes traditional school year)


Prop 30 Timeline